Irish Research Council 2014 Lindau Nobel Laureate Awards



Posted: 16 September, 2014

Since 1951, the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings have been bringing together the most esteemed scientists of their times with outstanding young scientists from all over the world annually. The meetings focus alternately on medicine and physiology, physics, chemistry, and economic sciences. These annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognised forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists.

This year the Irish Research Council were delighted with the success of 7 talented young researchers who were chosen in a competitive process to attend the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. The meeting this year was dedicated to Physiology, Medicine and Economics.

In recognition of their success the Minister for Skills, Research and Innovation Mr. Damien English TD and Professor Orla Feely Chairperson of the Irish Research Council presented the researchers with their specially designed awards at a ceremony that took place in Meath on 15th September.



Fergus McCarthyUCCMaternal & Foetal medicine
Sean SaundersTCDImmunology
Fionn O'BrienUCCPharmacology
Aideen RyanNUIGImmunology
Michael CurrenTCDEconomics
Sarah MitchellTCDEconomics
Patrick O'SullivanUCDEconomics

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